Guqin Music – The Dancing Crane and Homage-paying Geese (鶴舞鴻賓)

Guqin Music – The Dancing Crane and Homage-paying Geese (鶴舞鴻賓)

Featuring:Shuishan Yu, Fourth Generation Mei’an School Guqin Player
Date:Saturday, November 18, 2017
Time:7 – 8:30 pm
Location:Helmut Stern Auditorium, UMMA, 525 S. State St. Ann Arbor
Free and open to the public: Registration required. Click HERE.

The graceful fingerings that produce the beautiful melodies of guqin music had been praised as resembling the dancing crane and homage-paying geese in ancient manuals. Indeed, there were many pieces with the Chinese characters for “crane” (he) or “geese” (yan, hong) in their titles. This recital will feature some of the most remarkable pieces from the traditional repertoires. Most of them had been passed on from antiquity and reinterpreted and reinterpreted over generations. For instance, the famous “Flowing Waters” was credited to the Spring and Autumns Period (771-476 BCE) qin master Boya, while the most popular version of the piece today is largely based on the celebrated scores published in 1876 by Zhang Kongshan. Traditional guqin music is not a composition, but an eternal process of accumulation and a timeless effort of perfection. This recital is one such effort.

Shuishan Yu is a fourth generation Mei’an School guqin player, a Professor at the Northeastern University in Boston, and the Chair of North America Mei’an Guqin Society. Learning Chinese instruments since age seven, he later studied guqin with Wu Ziying, a third generation Mei’an School player who had learned from such renowned 20th-century masters as Wang Jiru, Xu Lisun, Wu Jinglue, and Zha Fuxi. Yu is especially committed to the spread of guqin among non-Chinese speaking communities. His fingering-centered etude writing aims to systematize experience-based guqin education and his composition explores new possibilities rooted in the Chinese musical traditions.

 

2017-11-06T12:36:25+00:00